How to make an MCAT study plan

Posted by Grant S. on 4/14/21 12:00 PM

When I taught high school science in DC Public Schools, my colleague had a saying whenever he would assign lengthy class projects. “There’s only one way to eat an elephant,” he would say, “one bite at a time.” Although his advice was intended for our class of grumbling adolescents, I found it increasingly applicable to my own extra-curricular project: studying for the MCAT. Breaking the MCAT down into manageable chunks helped me score a 526; here’s how you can make your own plan:

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Tags: MCAT

How to make the most of the two weeks before your MCAT

Posted by Abigail K. on 4/12/21 2:16 PM

I’ve always been someone who gets caught between cycles of procrastination and wild activity when a deadline is impending. The MCAT was no different for me; however, I really made the most out of those two weeks leading up to my exam date. With the right study execution, the final two weeks can be used to sharpen your exam-taking skills, leading to extra points that can’t be gained from studying the science alone. 

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Tags: MD/PhD admissions, MCAT

Tackling the AP English Language and Composition Essays: Part 2

Posted by Tess M. on 4/9/21 12:00 PM

Welcome back! In Part 1 of this series, we covered some basic information about the AP Lang essays, as well as the first two major components of the process, “Organizing Your Time” and “Reading and Annotating.” In Part 2, we’ll look at the final four components.

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Tags: English, AP exams

Tackling the AP English Language and Composition Essays: Part 1

Posted by Tess M. on 4/7/21 12:30 PM

More than any other test, the AP English Language and Composition Exam is dominated by essays. Three timed essays—the Synthesis Essay, Rhetoric Essay, and Argument Essay—will take up most of your time on the exam, and count for more than fifty percent of your score. In this three-part guide, I’ll walk you through the process of writing timed essays in the style of the AP Lang Exam. In Parts One and Two, I’ll give you some general tips on writing these essays, focusing primarily on the Rhetoric Essay (which is the most unique). In Part Three, I’ll apply what I’ve said to the other two essays, the Synthesis and Argument Essay (which are more similar to one another). These tips should also help you with timed writing exams in general. 

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Tags: English, AP exams

How to accurately notate a musical rhythm after hearing it just once

Posted by Michael Br. on 4/5/21 12:15 PM

If you have ever taken a music theory class, you have probably become familiar with the concept of dictation – essentially, the process of converting heard music into written, notated form. Dictation exercises are very common in these classes as a means to help students train their ears and hone their aural skills. Many students, however, dread doing them. I certainly know from experience that they can be extremely stressful! In this post, I want to share a strategy that can help take the stress out of rhythmic dictations and enable you to transcribe musical rhythms accurately and quickly – perhaps even on the first try.

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Tags: Tutors, Tutor Spotlights, music theory

TOEFL Reading: Inference Questions

Posted by John M. on 4/2/21 12:30 PM

The TOEFL Reading section involves several distinct types of questions. In preparing for your test, it is important to know: what kinds of questions there are, how to identify each kind of question, and how to answer each kind of question. This lesson will teach you how to identify and answer what the TOEFL calls Inference Questions.

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Tags: ESL

5 College Alumni Interview Do’s (and a few Don’ts)

Posted by Elise L. on 3/31/21 12:30 PM

First, the Do’s:

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Tags: college admissions

How to get to know a college when COVID means you can’t visit

Posted by Elise L. on 3/30/21 11:53 AM

As COVID was canceling proms and making graduations “drive-through” last spring, it was also causing a major shift in how colleges and admissions offices were introducing themselves to students and families. Students and families began to wonder, “How can I get to know if X College is right for me if I can’t visit and see it for myself?” Just because it looks different, it is still possible to get to know a school (and you can even do most of these in your pajamas!).

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Tags: college admissions

Making your personal statement stand out in just the first two lines

Posted by Michael M. on 3/26/21 1:30 PM

A personal statement is the best (and sometimes only) chance you have to make your application jump off the page. Even if you have outstanding test scores, those scores alone do not guarantee you admission. Which brings us to the personal statement, your chance to show your readers how engaging you are, how you are a future leader in your field, and how you’re an inspired applicant to invest in. This is where you can politely scream, “Look at me, I am uniquely qualified and my narrative is exactly what you want precisely because it doesn’t look like everyone else’s!” 

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Tags: admissions coaching, MD/PhD admissions, graduate admissions, college admssions

Pearls of knowledge: what my older pre-med mentors taught me

Posted by Marine-Ayan on 3/24/21 12:00 PM

As I suddenly realize that I am halfway through my gap year and that 2020 has been swallowed by the gaping maws of that-which-shall-not-be-named, I find myself with more time than usual to sit still. To be quiet and reflect on the years that have led me to the point at which I find myself. 

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Tags: medical school admissions, MCAT