High school chemistry: What is it? Can I learn it? Can I be any good at it?

Posted by Niyi on 9/2/19 11:00 AM

The word “chemistry” inspires so many emotions. To some, it brings about the excitement of mixing together a few glowing liquids and crafting the perfect radioactive potion that, when consumed, will make you a green giant and about 9000 times stronger. Next thing you know, Captain America is looking to recruit you as the newest Avenger. To others, it’s discombobulated numbers and letters on a piece a paper in Ms. Jacobs’ class, a concatenation that strikes fear and anxiety into the bravest of students. I mean … it looks like a foreign language!

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Tags: chemistry, high school

How to Write A Résumé In High School

Posted by Martha C. on 1/30/19 5:16 PM

This may be the first time you're writing your own résumé, and the task can feel daunting.  You may be asking questions like: how do I write about myself?  How do I highlight my very little experience?  What is the format of a résumé?

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Tags: high school, college admssions

Writing a Thesis and Topic Sentences in your Personal Statement

Posted by Martha C. on 10/10/18 5:51 PM

Every applicant who needs to write a personal statement for their high school, college, or graduate admissions struggles with structuring their personal statement.  It is hard enough to muster the courage to brainstorm your most salient life experiences on paper; now, the most important part is structuring your personal statement with your thesis and topic sentences.

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Tags: medical school admissions, law school admissions, MBA admissions, graduate admissions, high school, college admssions

How to Have Success as a Student Athlete: Tips from an Insider

Posted by Morgan on 4/26/18 5:40 AM

Ah, the student-athlete. In today’s landscape of college admissions and college scholarships, many of us recognize the importance and opportunity given to the student-athlete. In performing well and playing on a school’s team, you earn both a spot in the classroom at that institution and a “quote-unquote salary” for attracting revenue to the school through the sports program (i.e. earn a scholarship). The sport becomes a job in some sense, as one must continue to earn this benefit. Whether you currently are a collegiate student-athlete or an aspiring student-athlete (at the middle school or high school level), learning to balance the two is always tricky. The NCAA acknowledges that at any given moment during their education, student-athletes are all at once a full time athlete and a full time student. How can there possibly be enough hours in the day for juggling two full time jobs? From my experience as a tutor for this subset of students in college, there are student-athletes that can balance the two with great poise, others who struggle, and others that put the extra effort in to make it work. Today, I wanted to talk to you about some of the ways I have found work best to minimize the struggle - and these are applicable to both the student-athletes themselves and the tutors/teachers/mentors that work with them.

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Tags: study skills, high school

New Year’s Resolution: Get More Sleep

Posted by Danielle D. on 1/3/18 6:16 PM

If you’re in college or grad school and your New Year’s resolutions include plans like “earn higher grades,” “complete more work on time,” or even just “be more productive,” there’s one more resolution you should add to your list: get more sleep. It might sound counterintuitive—how do you get more done by making a resolution to spend more time doing nothing? But there are solid economic, medical, and social arguments that you’ll do better in school if you commit to eight hours a night, every night. Better yet, a spike in sleep research from all academic disciplines in the past few years means that the best advice for how you should sleep has gotten much better than just telling you to cut out the coffee. 

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Tags: college, high school

How to Help Your Child with Math Homework: 5 Easy Questions You Can Ask

Posted by Meghan on 1/9/17 6:22 PM

If you’re the parent of a teenager, chances are good that a few years have passed since you had to graph a polynomial or find a derivative. Since high school math covers topics that people working outside of STEM don’t come across very often, many parents don’t feel like they can give much help to their teenage children with their math homework. But you’re an adult who solves problems every day! You have a lot to offer your teenage student about how to approach problems productively, utilize resources, and access their own abilities. 

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Tags: high school, math

Is An Online Course Right for Me?

Posted by Pat C. on 11/28/16 10:43 PM

Why should I take an online course?

1. It can be a graduation saver

Taking an online course can be a graduation-saver. Having an illness, a family crisis, an unexpected failure in a course or a mistake made counting credits with one or two courses to go can create a situation where being able to take those last few credits without having to be on campus or pay for a full semester makes completing a degree possible. Taking an online course in the summer session can be a way to get a bit ahead on your coursework in order to graduate early. Some students use summer session as a way to raise their GPAs: take a course online and do very well at it and then also take one less course in the following semester which allows you to do better in all your courses. Because online courses are usually asynchronous, you can take one while you are working. 

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Tags: college, high school, graduate school

Four types of questions and when to ask them

Posted by Cypress Marss on 1/13/16 4:10 PM


source: Curious George and the Man in the Yellow Hat

When a toddler asks why to an infinite regress, their line of questioning inevitably becomes annoying. The reason is not that their questions individually are inherently uninteresting—or if answered seriously will not illicit fascinating information—but rather that the line of questioning that that toddler embarks on is without end.

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Tags: English, expository writing, college, high school

Choosing between AP and IB: an In-Depth Guide

Posted by Weike Wang on 12/28/15 3:07 PM

I went to the International Academy (IA), which, for two years, was ranked the number one public high school in America by USA Today. As a metric, they used the number of IB or AP tests each student took.  My high school was an all IB school, one of the first in the country, and as an IB school, it required every student to take 6 IBs.

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Tags: high school

Applying to the Best Prep Schools

Posted by Andrew Jungclaus on 8/21/15 11:00 AM

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Tags: middle school, high school