Drawing the chair conformation of a pyranose ring

Posted by Ellen Y. on 6/11/21 12:00 PM

Welcome back! In this blog post, we will complete the following example problem:

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Tags: chemistry, MCAT, college, organic chemistry

How to most effectively memorize in premedical courses

Posted by Emily R. on 5/13/21 9:53 AM

As an English major in undergrad, I did not have much experience with studying for tests, as I was often writing papers with little need to memorize facts or material. When I started a postbac program to complete my premedical requirements, I realized that I needed an efficient and effective way to memorize large amounts of material. Premedical courses – especially those that are largely fact-based like biology – necessitate the memorization of facts. While there are plenty of aspects of science that do not require memorization, like parts of organic chemistry and physics, even these classes have reactions, equations, and other facts that simply need to be committed to memory. This fact-based learning only increases in medical school, where courses like anatomy and pharmacology largely require pure memorization.  

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Tags: study skills, college, premed

Up close and personal: how to prepare for a close reading paper

Posted by Sylvie T. on 12/16/20 12:00 PM

Close reading? Shouldn’t we already be reading “closely” for class? Correct! But the term “close reading” also describes a very specific type of literary inquiry in which one pays careful, prolonged attention to a small chunk of text (or art object) in order to produce an argument about that text and how it works. Close reading is the bread-and-butter of many fields in the humanities and beyond. English majors close read poems and novels, art history majors close “read” paintings and sculptures, law majors close read legal documents, history majors close read primary sources, politics majors close read policy briefs—the list goes on!

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Tags: English, expository writing, college, high school

Statistics is for everyone and it may be a career for you

Posted by Danielle D. on 12/4/20 12:00 PM

“I never understood that.”

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Tags: statistics & probability, college, math

How to revise anything

Posted by Max N. on 10/5/20 4:27 PM

The most important part of writing is rewriting. Whether you’re working on a term paper, a personal statement, or a lab report, getting words on the page is just the first step. Even if you’re writing from an outline, the process of writing inevitably leads you to unexpected and interesting places. That’s part of the joy of writing, but it’s also why revision—literally, looking again—is all the more important. If the first part of writing is a mix of planning and inspiration, revision is where writing becomes craft. Through editing, a bunch of good ideas turns into a structured argument; a passionate statement of purpose, or a first-person essay, becomes a work of art.

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Tags: expository writing, college, high school

5 Tips to make you a more successful writer!

Posted by Rosa S. on 9/29/20 8:42 AM

Like many other tutors, what has been most useful for me is building myself up to writing. I use a lot of “tricks” to get around my anxiety about writing, and it often takes me several tries to get started. And with the pandemic, there are even more reasons to be distracted. Here are some tricks that have worked for me!

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Tags: expository writing, college, high school

Becoming a Good Test Taker

Posted by Jacob R. on 1/6/20 11:00 AM

You’ve heard it over and over: “She’s just a good test taker.” The phrase clings to standardized tests, where some students have the luck of Steph Curry sinking 30-foot shots while others feel like Shaquille O’Neill at the foul line. Like shooting a basketball, we often treat test taking as innate and immutable, but any basketball coach will tell you that hard work and a good advice can fix a jump shot. This makes perfect sense. We know every other part of the test can be prepared for. If you can learn to factor a quadratic or spot a misplaced semicolon, why can’t you learn to be a good test taker? The answer, of course, is that you can. You just need to know which muscles to train.

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Tags: study skills, college, high school

How to Pick a College for the First (or Second) Time: Advice on Selecting a School for First-Time Applicants or Transfers

Posted by Andrew So. on 7/24/19 11:20 AM

Well-meaning parents and older friends will probably tell you that college will be “the time of your life.” “You will find your people,” they might say. As a rising high school senior, I found this exciting and disconcerting: Would my peak be in college? And, how would I find my people anyway? I remember feeling both thrilled to graduate high school and overwhelmed by the college application process. I could not wait to meet new and interesting people and take fascinating courses in English and history, and my expectations for college could not have been higher. But, by the end of my first semester of college, I knew I wanted to transfer.

This blog post will examine how and why you should pick a school (whether as a first-time applicant or transfer) and what makes a school a good fit.

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Tags: college admissions, college

So, You’ve Declared Yourself a Pre-Med Student…

Posted by Viemma on 3/20/19 5:44 PM

Whether you knew you wanted to be a doctor since you were born, or you just sort of fell into medicine by chance, you have declared yourself a pre-med student. Welcome. You are about to embark on the journey of a lifetime. These next few years as a pre-med student will only be the beginning. The beginning of the road to becoming.

Now that you’ve committed to becoming a physician, below are some helpful tips to help your pre-med experience go smoothly.

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Tags: college, MD

How to Draft an Essay in College in 4 Easy Steps

Posted by Martha C. on 1/23/19 3:28 PM

Making the switch to college-level writing can be tough, and it doesn’t happen overnight. Aside from the fact that papers in college are often long (although the short ones with strict word limits can be tricky, too!), the subject matter is often complicated and requires a good deal of analysis. Professors often expect that you already have a certain level of skill and experience in expository writing, and therefore don’t give you the guidance and structural requirements that you’re probably used to from your high school teachers. Add to that the fact that you don’t know your professor’s style and expectations as well as you did the high school teacher you saw every day, and things really get complicated.

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Tags: English, expository writing, college