How to tackle a writing prompt

Posted by Emily K. on 10/21/20 8:50 AM

Students are accustomed to learning and analyzing a variety of written genres—plays, poetry, novels—yet one extremely common genre is usually left for students to analyze blind. This genre is the writing prompt.

Read More

Tags: English, expository writing, college, high school, college admssions

How to revise anything

Posted by Max N. on 10/5/20 4:27 PM

The most important part of writing is rewriting. Whether you’re working on a term paper, a personal statement, or a lab report, getting words on the page is just the first step. Even if you’re writing from an outline, the process of writing inevitably leads you to unexpected and interesting places. That’s part of the joy of writing, but it’s also why revision—literally, looking again—is all the more important. If the first part of writing is a mix of planning and inspiration, revision is where writing becomes craft. Through editing, a bunch of good ideas turns into a structured argument; a passionate statement of purpose, or a first-person essay, becomes a work of art.

Read More

Tags: expository writing, college, high school

5 Tips to make you a more successful writer!

Posted by Rosa S. on 9/29/20 8:42 AM

Like many other tutors, what has been most useful for me is building myself up to writing. I use a lot of “tricks” to get around my anxiety about writing, and it often takes me several tries to get started. And with the pandemic, there are even more reasons to be distracted. Here are some tricks that have worked for me!

Read More

Tags: expository writing, college, high school

What is Collections Management?

Posted by Janet C. on 5/13/20 5:51 PM

Two of the most popular career paths after getting a graduate degree in Art History are Curatorial or Conservation. However, most undergraduates (and graduates!) don’t realize that there is so much more to the museum field beyond these two ultra-competitive career paths. Today, I’ll focus on the Collections Management department.

Read More

Tags: academic tutor, college, graduate school

Studying at Home: How to Keep up with Work During Covid-19

Posted by Elizabeth D. on 3/23/20 8:33 AM

By now, most of us are dealing with the reality that we cannot go to school. We may have school content posted online or packets of work to complete, but we are most likely not allowed to physically be at school with our teachers and classmates. We are now, essentially, homeschooling.

Read More

Tags: study skills, homework help, college, high school, study

How to fit you into your personal statement

Posted by Emile Me. on 3/11/20 11:00 AM

The question “what do you like to do for fun?” has always stressed me out. As someone who preaches work-life balance and champions new experiences, I like to imagine myself as the type of person who would quickly rattle off an impressive and well-rounded list of hobbies and activities. The truth of the matter is that each time I am confronted with that question I find myself drawing a complete blank. Suddenly my mind is a gaping void, incapable of remembering the wonderful book I finished last weekend or the ski trip I have planned the coming week. I generally leave the conversation feeling as if I’ve presented myself as, well…completely boring.

Read More

Tags: college, college admssions

Three Simple Tips for De-Stressing the Admissions Process

Posted by Lindsay Z. on 1/22/20 11:00 AM

To state the obvious: applying to school—whether it’s college or grad school—is stressful and time consuming. There’s the anxiety about whether you’ll get in to your top schools, the painstaking work of tailoring your application to each school, and the challenge of balancing your applications with existing commitments, like work, activities, friends, and family.

Read More

Tags: college, college admssions

Authentic and vulnerable reflection in your college personal statement

Posted by Nathaly on 1/17/20 11:00 AM

The personal statement is one of the most important factors in your application. But in the end, it’s your story. Here’s the secret: it doesn’t matter what you write about; what matters is how you write it. If you write astutely and creatively, and if the story is yours, your essay will be unique and unforgettable.

Read More

Tags: college, college admssions

Becoming a Good Test Taker

Posted by Jacob R. on 1/6/20 11:00 AM

You’ve heard it over and over: “She’s just a good test taker.” The phrase clings to standardized tests, where some students have the luck of Steph Curry sinking 30-foot shots while others feel like Shaquille O’Neill at the foul line. Like shooting a basketball, we often treat test taking as innate and immutable, but any basketball coach will tell you that hard work and a good advice can fix a jump shot. This makes perfect sense. We know every other part of the test can be prepared for. If you can learn to factor a quadratic or spot a misplaced semicolon, why can’t you learn to be a good test taker? The answer, of course, is that you can. You just need to know which muscles to train.

Read More

Tags: study skills, college, high school

Top 5 pitfalls to avoid when writing the supplemental “Why College X?” essay

Posted by Fatima B. on 10/16/19 11:00 AM

Many colleges require students to write school-specific supplemental essays. These are usually some variation of what I call the “Why Us?” prompt. For instance, Yale asks, “What is it about Yale that has led you to apply?” and Columbia requires 300 words on, “Please tell us what you value most about Columbia and why.”

Read More

Tags: admissions coaching, college, college admssions