Start by learning how you learn…and then tackle the sciences

Posted by Casey L. on 10/6/20 9:57 AM

When I was an undergraduate, I had a wonderful research mentor in a neuroendocrinology lab, and it was this research experience that led me to pursue a Ph.D. in neuroscience. My research mentor was deeply interested in the process of learning. In my time as his advisee, he taught me how to study efficiently, how to really remember something in the long run, and how to make the most of a busy schedule. The principles he taught me not only made me a better student of biology, but a better student period. Learning about how you learn is applicable to any discipline. Here are my tips for getting started:

Read More

Tags: biology, study skills

How to revise anything

Posted by Max N. on 10/5/20 4:27 PM

The most important part of writing is rewriting. Whether you’re working on a term paper, a personal statement, or a lab report, getting words on the page is just the first step. Even if you’re writing from an outline, the process of writing inevitably leads you to unexpected and interesting places. That’s part of the joy of writing, but it’s also why revision—literally, looking again—is all the more important. If the first part of writing is a mix of planning and inspiration, revision is where writing becomes craft. Through editing, a bunch of good ideas turns into a structured argument; a passionate statement of purpose, or a first-person essay, becomes a work of art.

Read More

Tags: expository writing, college, high school

Finding Patterns in Exponent Problems on the GRE Quantitative Section

Posted by Sean on 10/1/20 9:37 AM

One thing about GRE quant questions and standardized test math questions more broadly: if a question seems impossible or like it will take a ridiculously long amount of time to complete… It isn’t as difficult as it seems! Let’s dive right into a practice problem to see an example. Take the following numeric entry problem:

Read More

Tags: GRE

5 Tips to make you a more successful writer!

Posted by Rosa S. on 9/29/20 8:42 AM

Like many other tutors, what has been most useful for me is building myself up to writing. I use a lot of “tricks” to get around my anxiety about writing, and it often takes me several tries to get started. And with the pandemic, there are even more reasons to be distracted. Here are some tricks that have worked for me!

Read More

Tags: expository writing, college, high school

Choosing a research lab as a pre-medical student

Posted by Tarun K. on 9/25/20 8:32 AM

So you’re a pre-med student who is trying to choose their first research laboratory. You might have done your research on how to approach mentors, why research is important for your application, but how about how to choose a lab? Well, look no further – here are three important qualities to keep in mind when considering a number of different labs:

Read More

Tags: medical school admissions

Translator Do’s and Don’ts for Spanish Fluency

Posted by Eric M. on 9/24/20 8:32 AM

Day One of sixth grade: my first ever Spanish class. After learning a few different ways to say “hello” and “goodbye,” we were given our homework: use our newfound knowledge to fill in the blank speech bubbles in a Charlie Brown cartoon. Determined to wow my teacher, I hatched a plan to stand out from the crowd. I rushed home, opened up Google Translate, and frantically typed in, “I still can’t kick that football!” I knew I would make quite the impression.

Read More

Tags: Spanish

Three Tips for the Final Week Before Your LSAT Test Day

Posted by Brian S. on 9/23/20 8:19 AM

You have been studying for months, day in and day out, pushing to get your goal score. Finally, in just another week you’ll be done with the LSAT. However, before you find yourself on your dream vacation to Niagara Falls, you still must get through this final week of studying and the actual LSAT test day.

Read More

Tags: LSAT, law school admissions

Pituitary Gland Hormones Made Simple!

Posted by Elizabeth R. on 9/18/20 8:37 AM

What is the pituitary gland?

Even though the pituitary gland is about the size of a pea, it plays a very important role in regulating a lot of our body’s endocrine functions. Located in an area known as the sella turcica at the base of the brain and suspended from the hypothalamus by a stalk, the pituitary gland consists of two parts: the anterior/front lobe (which accounts for the majority of the pituitary gland’s weight), and the posterior/back lobe.

Read More

Tags: biology, medical school admissions, MCAT

How to Study Efficiently for Hours On End (With the Help of a Tomato)

Posted by Jeremy G. on 9/17/20 8:21 AM

If you’re like me, the long open days of the weekend, summer vacation, or Covid-19-induced lockdown can seem to stretch forever. These days or long afternoons are great opportunities to nail down some studying. Yet, all too often I catch myself having wasted hours of my study time reading the New York Times, falling down a YouTube hole, or sending unimportant emails.

Read More

Tags: study skills, homework help

A Short Guide To Using The GRE’s On-Screen Calculator

Posted by Charles P. on 9/16/20 9:43 AM

The Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE is unique in that it provides a tool that sections on similar standardized exams lack: an on-screen calculator. Though this distinction may relieve those who feel intimidated by math or by standardized exams in general, it also challenges those trying to determine the best strategy for employing its use. One can imagine two extremes while taking the exam: one where time is wasted by using the device too often and the other where time is wasted by abstaining from using it all together. Both cases highlight test-taking habits that are not easily broken. However, to help, here are a few quick rules for when to use a calculator on the GRE exam.

Read More

Tags: graduate admissions, GRE