Part 1 of your law school guide: before even beginning to study...

Posted by Jimmy B. on 6/10/19 6:53 PM

Applying to law school is scary – there’s no way around it. The process is arduous, the LSAT is a behemoth, and the end-game is expensive and rigorous. But law school is wonderful – challenging, meaningful, and exciting. Reminding yourself of why you are applying, what is motivating you to apply, can help you get through the year(s)-long process. Below is a brief, though hopefully comprehensive, guide to all things LSAT.

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Tags: LSAT, law school admissions, law school

Five Dos and Don'ts of LSAT Test Day

Posted by Caitlin on 5/20/19 8:01 PM

So LSAT test day is finally here. You’ve studied hard, you’ve taken practice tests, and now you are at the mercy of the test itself. Here are some Do’s and Don’ts (several of which I made myself!) to consider for test day:

1. DO Get enough sleep!

I’m sure everyone gives you this advice when it comes to, well, just about everything. It is just as true for test day. However, most people don’t know that sleep two days before the test can be even more important than the night before. If you’re taking a Saturday test, put down the books (and the drinks) on Thursday and get to bed early. That way, even if your anxiety kicks in Friday night and you have trouble sleeping, your adrenaline will still carry you through the test.

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Tags: LSAT

Minding Your Ps and Qs on the LSAT: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

Posted by Nancy on 5/10/19 5:32 PM

If you’ve ever been told to “mind your Ps and Qs”, you know that the expression equates to being instructed to mind your manners. That is, of course, unless you’re studying for the LSAT, where Ps and Qs have nothing to do with being polite. In fact, seeing Ps and Qs may inspire some LSAT takers to feel particularly impolite: they generally signify a conditional reasoning problem, which can be stressful and confusing for those not familiar with how conditional reasoning works. However, with a little effort we can easily demystify the basics of conditional reasoning, so that you’re able to mind all types of Ps and Qs.

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Tags: LSAT

Dear LSAT taker: if you are hurting, read this

Posted by Preston on 4/17/19 4:43 PM

One morning in November 2016, I sat on a 36 Broadway bus heading southbound towards the downtown loop. It was a cold morning in Chicago, sometime around 4:45 a.m. The bus was empty, save the bus driver and me. I was three months into LSAT preparation, a process (for reasons unknown to God and Man) I took on while working a full-time job at a law firm. I was listening to the same “Motivational” playlist that I created when I started taking a full LSAT practice test every morning before work, but that morning, I had already heard the tracks too many times for them to do any “motivating.” The tracks were tired. So was I. And as I sat there in my work clothes, pouring over my PT from the prior morning to fill myself with some inspired thought that would push me through the scoring plateau I was in, I started to cry.

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Tags: LSAT

How to Reason Through LSAT Problems as an ESL Learner

Posted by Songhoon on 4/15/19 8:17 PM

Let me begin this introduction by admitting to something that I think no other student newly admitted to Harvard Law School’s JD Program would admit to: I find English incredibly hard.

I am a U.S. Citizen who was born in and raised in Seoul, South Korea. I’ve lived there for over 20 years and Korean has been my native language my entire life. I was in Chinook Middle School’s English as a Second Language (ESL) Program until 8th grade. Now, thanks to reading The New York Times every day since 8th grade (I didn’t have too many friends back then, as it should be obvious by now), I was able to significantly improve over the years.

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Tags: LSAT, ESL

How To Study For The LSAT Without Burning Out

Posted by Audrianne on 1/14/19 5:39 PM


I, like many aspiring law students, knew I was on a law school trajectory quite a while before I applied. I knew that a good LSAT score would make a huge difference in my life. I wanted to set myself up for success, but I definitely didn’t want to start studying LSAT textbooks. Instead, I loosely “studied” for the LSAT for about a year by doing parallel activities that improved my LSAT skills. I ultimately settled down with a 10-week study program before my official LSAT. While this may not be the right choice for everyone, it really worked for me. Being able to weave studying into my own timeline while I worked full-time allowed me a nice work-study-life balance that not all of my friends achieved.

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Tags: LSAT

Three Things I Wish I Knew Before I Delayed My First LSAT Exam

Posted by Corinna on 11/16/18 5:50 PM

My LSAT journey should have been fast and easy. Instead, I dragged it out for 4 years, and it became a bit of a monstrosity. Here are three things I wish I knew before I opted to wait to take my first LSAT exam.

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Tags: LSAT

Logical Reasoning: A Brief Introduction to Question Types

Posted by Spencer on 10/19/18 5:26 PM

The following are some of the question types you will see on the LSAT Logical Reasoning Section. Again, there are often questions that appear that are not standard in the exam; however, the following types are the most common questions asked. They are (roughly) listed in order of frequency. 

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Tags: LSAT, law school admissions, law school

7 Essential Tips for ANY Standardized Test

Posted by Zoe Balaconis on 8/15/18 6:56 PM

Whether you’re applying to college, graduate school, law school, medical school, or even some jobs, standardized tests are often part of the process. They can be intimidating, long, arduous, and confusing, but with some practice, you’ll learn how to overcome any test-taking anxiety and stay focused. Here are a few tips and tricks for going into a test calm and prepared.

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Tags: study skills, LSAT, test anxiety, ACT, GMAT, SAT, MCAT, PSAT

GMAT or LSAT? A JD/MBA Candidate's Perspective On The Exams

Posted by Chris M. on 8/6/18 8:13 PM

I had the honor of taking both the GMAT and LSAT. Many students have asked how I decided between business and law schools. I view business school as a leadership degree and law school as a degree that trains you to be an attorney. Are two degrees better than one? Maybe, but maybe not. If you want to pursue JD/MBA degrees simultaneously, each school requires you to apply separately during the admissions cycle. What are some ways you can use dual degrees? While having both degrees open up additional job opportunities, it really depends on your goal and aspiration in life. For example, you can start your own a business without a law (or even business) degree. However, you cannot practice law without a law degree.  

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Tags: LSAT