Logical Reasoning: A Brief Introduction to Question Types

Posted by Spencer on 10/19/18 5:26 PM

The following are some of the question types you will see on the LSAT Logical Reasoning Section. Again, there are often questions that appear that are not standard in the exam; however, the following types are the most common questions asked. They are (roughly) listed in order of frequency. 

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Tags: LSAT, law school, law school admissions

7 Essential Tips for ANY Standardized Test

Posted by Zoe Balaconis on 8/15/18 6:56 PM

Whether you’re applying to college, graduate school, law school, medical school, or even some jobs, standardized tests are often part of the process. They can be intimidating, long, arduous, and confusing, but with some practice, you’ll learn how to overcome any test-taking anxiety and stay focused. Here are a few tips and tricks for going into a test calm and prepared.

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Tags: test anxiety, study skills, SAT, ACT, PSAT, LSAT, GMAT, MCAT

GMAT or LSAT? A JD/MBA Candidate's Perspective On The Exams

Posted by Chris M. on 8/6/18 8:13 PM

I had the honor of taking both the GMAT and LSAT. Many students have asked how I decided between business and law schools. I view business school as a leadership degree and law school as a degree that trains you to be an attorney. Are two degrees better than one? Maybe, but maybe not. If you want to pursue JD/MBA degrees simultaneously, each school requires you to apply separately during the admissions cycle. What are some ways you can use dual degrees? While having both degrees open up additional job opportunities, it really depends on your goal and aspiration in life. For example, you can start your own a business without a law (or even business) degree. However, you cannot practice law without a law degree.  

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Tags: LSAT

The LSAT: Cracking Sufficient Assumption Questions

Posted by Jimmy B. on 7/20/18 6:14 PM

Many students find Sufficient Assumption questions to be among the most difficult on the LSAT. They are relatively with common, and students should expect 2-4 per exam. While they are not the most frequent question type, they tend to eat up a large amount of students’ time. However, with the right strategies, they become much easier to solve. Here are three examples, all from LSAT 70.

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Tags: LSAT

Telling the Whole Truth: Conditional Truth Tables

Posted by Nancy on 5/14/18 10:37 PM

One day - in the not so far off future - when you’re an amazing lawyer (having first crushed the LSAT, of course), any witnesses you call to testify will have to swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Unfortunately, some truths are harder to determine then others. While we may be able to tell the truth about our own life experiences, things get a little trickier when it comes to the ‘truth’ of conditional statements. In our first blog post on conditionals, we covered what conditional statements are, as well as going through the differences between necessary and sufficient conditions. The second post discussed manipulating conditional statements, so that you could find the inverse, converse, and contrapositive of a conditional (with a little help from Missy Elliott). In this post, we’ll be going over how a table setup can help you figure out the truth of conditional statements.

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Tags: LSAT

What Missy Elliott Can Teach You About Conditionals & Contrapositives

Posted by Nancy on 4/23/18 6:47 PM

Rapper Missy Elliott’s hit 2002 song ‘Work It’ - parental advisory warning required - was my go to LSAT study prep song. This was not due to my deep affinity for Elliott’s music (I’m more of a Childish Gambino type of girl), but because the lyrics of ‘Work It’ contain a hidden key to mastering contrapositive statements. In our last post, we covered the basics of conditional statements. Now that we know our Ps and Qs, we are ready to manipulate conditionals, which will include learning about inverses, converses, and the dreaded contrapositives.

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Tags: LSAT

Minding Your Ps and Qs on the LSAT: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

Posted by Nancy on 4/18/18 6:05 PM

If you’ve ever been told to “mind your Ps and Qs”, you know that the expression equates to being instructed to mind your manners. That is, of course, unless you’re studying for the LSAT, where Ps and Qs have nothing to do with being polite. In fact, seeing Ps and Qs may inspire some LSAT takers to feel particularly impolite: they generally signify a conditional reasoning problem, which can be stressful and confusing for those not familiar with how conditional reasoning works. However, with a little effort we can easily demystify the basics of conditional reasoning, so that you’re able to mind all types of Ps and Qs.

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Tags: LSAT

A 6-month Plan to Study for the LSAT, Inspired by Miracle 

Posted by Nathaniel on 4/2/18 6:00 PM

The September LSAT is less than 6 months away, and I just watched Miracle for the first time. That happy confluence of events produced this: a roughly 6-month study plan for the LSAT that mirrors the approach Team USA took in preparing to face the reigning 4-time Olympic hockey champions. I want you to study smarter—adopting only the best strategies that will get you the most gain—and harder: putting in the work of many practice problems to get faster, leaner, & yes, meaner on the test (see the section on attitude below). Now, you might be thinking what the skeptical USA Hockey official said when he heard Coach Brooks’s plan in Miracle, “Walter, we don’t have years, we have months.” The good news is that’s enough time to put the following plan into action. Also, don’t call me Walter.

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Tags: LSAT

Five Dos and Don'ts of LSAT Test Day

Posted by Caitlin on 3/5/18 5:11 PM

So LSAT test day is finally here. You’ve studied hard, you’ve taken practice tests, and now you are at the mercy of the test itself. Here are some Do’s and Don’ts (several of which I made myself!) to consider for test day:

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Tags: LSAT

How To Study For The LSAT Without Burning Out

Posted by Audrianne on 2/2/18 5:02 PM

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Tags: LSAT