Five quick-and-easy English words to elevate your writing

Posted by Anthony N on 8/13/20 9:57 AM

Anyone studying English will at one point or another recognize that the language is quite a hodgepodge. Centuries of outside contact – from Viking and Norman invasions to importations of Latin during the Renaissance – led to what would become the rich vocabulary of Modern English. But what should a savvy writer do with so much variation when crafting an essay, and why should readers care?

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Tags: English, expository writing

Tone and mood

Posted by Vidya R. on 4/8/20 11:00 AM

When attempting an analysis of a text for the IBDP English course, some of the advanced features that students have to understand concern tone and mood. It is customary to associate tone with dialogue and speech, and mood with the setting of novels. However, tone and mood are not just features of fiction and can also be found in non-fictional texts such as media texts, popular scientific articles and so on. They are inherent attributes of language.

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Tags: creative writing, English, expository writing

Confronting commas on the SAT writing and language section.

Posted by Elizabeth L. on 1/15/20 11:00 AM

You see commas everywhere when you're reading, and you may put them everywhere when you're writing, but do you really know when to properly use this tricky punctuation mark? The SAT requires you to know exactly when a comma is either necessary or obstructive, so it is important to take the time to learn comma rules as you prepare for the writing and language section of the test. To help you get started, here are a few scenarios that require the use of a comma:

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Tags: creative writing, English, expository writing

Homonyms

Posted by Alison on 1/3/20 11:00 AM

English is one of the languages in which spelling is a big deal. Spelling bees were created in English, and the concept is not present in other languages in which words are more often pronounced just like they look. In English, we have words that are pronounced the same but have different meanings and spellings (homophones). We also have a lot of words that are spelled the same but have different meanings; these words are homonyms, and they are the focus of this post.

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Tags: homework help, English, high school

Grammar: One to 1

Posted by Alison on 1/1/20 11:00 AM

When learning a new language, students almost always begin with the alphabet and numbers. We use letters, of course, to form words, which form sentences that express ideas of varying complexity in a form that people who read this written language can understand. Numbers designate a different kind of language, one that conveys equations and measurements, mathematical calculations and scientific formulas. But sometimes the two forms come together, when, for example, we are outlining how to follow numerical steps or stating someone’s age or simply noting that there is more than one right way to write numbers. How and when are we supposed to put numbers into words?

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Tags: creative writing, English, expository writing

Fun English Facts

Posted by Alison on 12/23/19 11:00 AM

English is weird. There is no denying it. As one of the most fluid languages in terms of its continued evolution over time, it has historically been quite a difficult language to learn. And yet, it is considered the world’s universal language. Below are 10 fun facts you may not have known about English:

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Tags: English

Betwixt and between: difficult grammar rules explained

Posted by Alison on 11/25/19 11:00 AM

English is not the easiest language to learn. This may be because of the many exceptions to its rules or because the same combinations of letters can be pronounced in many different ways. English also has one of the largest vocabularies of any recorded language, which means English speakers can say what they mean in a lot of different ways, but they also have a lot more words potentially to misuse, often without even realizing it. This post covers the correct application of some words that sound right but are often spoken or written in the wrong time or place.

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Tags: creative writing, English, expository writing

Five strategies to improve your writing

Posted by Rachel Y. on 9/4/19 2:00 PM

Writing is at the center of our daily lives. From coursework to communicating with colleagues or loved ones, writing is how we share our voice. Here are five simple strategies to improve the quality of your writing:

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Tags: creative writing, English, expository writing

Breaking Down the Writing Process: 5 Tips

Posted by Evan J on 7/17/19 4:14 PM

I was recently helping someone with a comparative essay they had to write for school. This person did not like writing—a common enough state of affairs. They felt that they had no talent for it. The process frustrated them. I could see that they were struggling in part because they were trying to do everything at once (come up with ideas, write grammatically sound sentences, discover their own thinking and opinions on the topic at hand).

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Tags: creative writing, English, expository writing

A 5 Part Plan to Studying SAT Vocabulary

Posted by Chris Schlegel on 5/17/19 4:09 PM

Hello! My name is Chris S., and I’m an SAT tutor with Cambridge Coaching. I’m also a PhD student in American poetry at Harvard. Like Mac S., who’s written about vocabulary studying, I think it’s unhelpful to worry too much about the millions of novels, essays, poems, and new words that exist—those mountains upon mountains of text. Instead, I like to de-stress vocab through the reinforcement of good habits—little fixes to the big question of improving English proficiency.

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Tags: English